NOVICA Animal Themed Wood Drums, Brown, ‘Revival’

NOVICA Animal Themed Wood Drums, Brown, ‘Revival’

NOVICA Animal Themed Wood Drums, Brown, 'Revival'
  • Size: 10.75″ H x 6.25″ Diam.
  • Authentic: an original NOVICA fair trade product in association with National Geographic.
  • Certified: comes with an official NOVICA Story Card certifying quality & authenticity.
  • Exceptional Artisan Quality by Ernestina Oppong Asante
  • Product Info: Tweneboa wood, goatskin, cotton, brass and glass

NOVICA Animal Themed Wood Drums, Brown, 'Revival'

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NOVICA, in association with National Geographic, works together with talented artisan designers around the world to produce stunning, keepsake treasures. Our mantra is to spread global happiness, so rest assured – we’ll do everything we possibly can to ensure you’re a happy customer. About this item: The Sankofa Anoma symbol graces this beautiful mini-djembe by Ernestina Oppong Asante. An Adinkra symbol communicating popular wisdom, it directs Africans to the roots and strengths of their beginnings and past. The bird turns its head and neck an almost impossible 180 degrees, because no strain is too hard for gathering bygone experiences and learning from them. The symbol is drawn from a proverb meaning “Go back to fetch it,” inferring learning from the past in order to build for the future; it translates as “positive reversion and revival.” Carved from tweneboa wood, this beautiful percussion instrument is finished with mansion polish. Glass beads and brass plates further embellish it. The goatskin drumhead is affixed by iron rings wrapped in cotton, and a macramé cord can be slung over the shoulder. The djembe originated in Benin, where it is used during voodoo rites. It has been introduced into neighboring countries and is indispensable in contemporary reggae. – Instrument Rating: Beginner quality, intended for casual use About our Artist: ‘I was born in the eastern region of Ghana and trained in dressmaking but realized that the trade would not do well in my town,’ Ernestina Oppong Assante says. ‘I therefore trained for three years as a wood carver, and began developing woodcarvings on my own. Though carving has long been regarded as the preserve of men, I am glad that I have been able not only to infiltrate but to also make an impact on the trade.’

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